Why do we rarely get sick in a train?

Unlike other modes of transport, it’s fairly unusual to get sick in a train. This singularity isn’t due to the basic characteristics of rail transport, but rather to the work of railway engineers, who have succeeded in developing techniques that limit the effect of bends on the body.

Why do we rarely get sick in a train?

Travel sickness or kinetosis arises from an imbalance between three of our perceptions: proprioception, vision, and balance. The train rarely makes us sick because of its stability, the visibility it offers, and the techniques used to compensate for the effect of centrifugal force in bends, which include tilting the car body and elevating the outside rail. The inclination must be perfectly adapted to the speed, to guarantee comfort and an equilibrium between movement that is felt and movement that is visually perceived.

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